Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

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Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por Berserk el Vie Dic 07, 2012 6:36 pm

hilarious  hilarious  hilarious Se veia venir hace mucho. El resto del mundo debe estar  gaah  gaah  gaah  gaah

Federal government cancels F-35 fighter purchase

The F-35 jet fighter purchase, the most persistent thorn in the Harper government’s side and the subject of a devastating auditor-general’s report last spring, is dead.

Faced with the imminent release of an audit by accountants KPMG that will push the total projected life-cycle costs of the aircraft above $30 billion, the Harper Conservatives have decided to scrap the controversial sole-source program and go back to the drawing board, a source familiar with the decision said. This occurred after Chief of the Defence Staff Thomas Lawson, while en route overseas, was called back urgently to appear before members of the cabinet, the source said.

The decision was to go before the cabinet planning and priorities committee Friday morning but the outcome is not in doubt, the source said.

PMO spokesman Andrew MacDougall took to Twitter Thursday evening to deny a decision has been made. “The government will fulfill its seven-point plan,” he tweeted.

The government is “awaiting reports that will be tabled as part of the seven-point plan,” MacDougall said later in an email. “Government will need this information to make an informed decision.”

The cabinet meeting Friday morning was to have established a communications plan for unveiling the change of direction to Canadians, Postmedia’s source said.

The decision is sure to have ripple effects around the world, as any reduction in the number of aircraft on order causes the price to go up for all the other buyers. Canada is one of nine F-35 consortium members, including the United States.

The CF-18s currently flown by the RCAF are at the tail end of their life cycle and are not expected to be operable much beyond 2020 at the outside.

The fighter procurement process has been the responsibility of Public Works Minister Rona Ambrose since last spring, following an audit by Auditor General Michael Ferguson. It is understood that veteran senior bureaucrat Tom Ring, who handled the government’s much-praised shipbuilding contract process in the fall of 2011, is now steering the reframed fighter replacement process, from within Public Works.

Last spring, Ferguson ignited a political firestorm when he reported that the top-line cost cited by the Conservatives in the 2011 election campaign – $9-billion for 65 planes, or $15-billion including maintenance and other life-cycle costs – was $10-billion below the Defence department’s internal estimate.

Even the internal figure of $25.1-billion was suspect, critics said, because it assumed a 20-year life cycle. The longevity of the Lockheed-Martin-built aircraft, according to the Pentagon, is 36 years.

KPMG’s audit, due out next week, has confirmed the contention, long made by critics such as former assistant deputy minister (materiel) Alan Williams, that the F-35 program’s real cost would be much higher than any previously stated government estimate, sources say.

Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page predicted a cost of $30 billion over a 30-year life cycle.

Public Works Minister Rona Ambrose, who took on the F-35 file after Ferguson’s audit, has been signalling since last spring that she was unhappy with the procurement process. On Nov. 22 in the House of Commons, Ambrose said the government is committed to “a full evaluation of all choices, not simply a refresh.”

Lawson, in an appearance before the House of Commons defence committee Nov. 29, further opened the door when he confirmed what industry critics have long said: the F-35 is not the only modern fighter with measures to evade radar, though it is considered to be the most advanced in this respect.  “Is there only one airplane that can meet the standard of stealth that’s set out in the statement of requirements?” Liberal defence critic John McKay asked. Lawson’s answer: “No.”

The F-35’s unique stealthiness had long been advanced as the single most compelling argument for buying that plane.

Also in the mix, former Industry Minister David Emerson last week published a report on the aerospace and space sectors, calling on Ottawa to more aggressively press for Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRBs) and In-Service Support (ISS) contracts when inking procurement deals. Lockheed-Martin has in the past been reluctant to hand over its proprietary technology to clients. Industry insiders believe the Emerson report added impetus to the decision to start over.

Boeing’s Super Hornet, Dassault’s Rafale, Saab’s Gripen, the Eurofighter Typhoon and the F-35 are seen as the leading contenders in any new contest to replace the CF-18 fleet.

http://o.canada.com/2012/12/06/1107-col-dentandt/

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por Berserk el Vie Dic 07, 2012 6:48 pm

AJAJAJJAJ ahora que no esta cancelada la compra Facepalm Facepalm

Tories misled Canadians on F-35, opposition MPs charge

Interim Liberal Leader says Defence Minister Peter MacKay should step down

The government has consistently misled Canadians and is continuing to hide the true cost of the F-35 fighter jets being considered to replace the military's aging CF-18s, opposition MPs charged Friday.

"I don't see how the minister of defence [Peter MacKay] can possibly continue in his job," interim Liberal Leader Bob Rae said.

"He's basically been a sales spokesperson for Lockheed Martin, the manufacturers of the F-35 since he took office. He's denigrated and attacked every person in opposition, in the Liberal Party or elsewhere, who has ever raised concerns or questions about this."

The Conservative government says it has not made a decision on the F-35 as a replacement for Canada's CF-18 fighter jets, but it now appears to concede that alternative fighter purchase options will be considered.

The Prime Minister's Office denied a media report Thursday that the F-35 purchase was dead, calling the report "inaccurate on a number of fronts" and promising to update the House of Commons on its seven-point plan to replace the jets before the House rises for the Christmas break at the end of next week.

April 2: Tories set up Public Works secretariat to manage file after scathing Auditor General's report

That plan is now expected to follow through with a real competition and statement of requirements, something that the initial process lacked. Depending on the result of the competition, Canada could follow through with the F-35 purchase, choose another aircraft instead, or buy different planes to suit different needs. A frequently mentioned alternative to the F-35 is the Boeing Super Hornet, a new version of the F-18.

A spokesman for MacKay said he is not resigning and echoed a statement by Public Works Minister Rona Ambrose from the night before.

"Rae's comments are puzzling. Despite speculation the government hasn't announced anything. Our government is continuing to move forward with our seven-point plan. The government will be providing a comprehensive public update before the House rises," Jay Paxton said.

A spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper said on Twitter that MacKay would not be resigning.

"Not going to happen," Andrew MacDougall tweeted to a Liberal staffer. "Full confidence in [Peter MacKay]."

'Completely and totally untrue'

Speaking in Toronto, Rae said all of what the government has said "has been shown to be completely and totally untrue."

"The government has consistently misled Canadians about the true cost of this aircraft. They've misled Canadians about their degree of oversight and their readiness to deal with the situation," he said.

After Auditor General Michael Ferguson questioned the military's figures last April, the Harper government promised to "hit the reset button" on the entire purchase. An "options analysis" would consider the alternative fighter jets that may meet the military's needs.

Part of that process for replacing the aircraft is an audit of the F-35's costs by accounting firm KPMG. The government said Thursday it now has the report and is reviewing it.

CBC News has learned the KPMG report is based on a longer and more realistic life cycle for the next-generation stealth fighter, which would therefore also arrive with a higher price tag than previously reported. The actual cost could be as high as $40 billion.

The cost of the F-35 project was first pegged at $9 billion for 65 planes when it was announced by the government more than two years ago, but a report by the parliamentary budget officer put it at $29.3 billion over 30 years. The federal auditor general put the total cost to buy and maintain the planes at $25 billion.

Public Works took over the process for procuring a CF-18 replacement earlier this year, extending the original deadlines for its work "to get it right."

Conservative MPs defend MacKay

Opposition MPs devoted much of Friday's question period to questions about the F-35, with the Liberals focusing on whether MacKay will step down.

MacKay was in the House of Commons but didn't stand to take any questions, allowing Government House Leader Peter Van Loan and Ambrose's parliamentary secretary, Jacques Gourde, to respond instead.

MacKay paused briefly on his way out of the House to say there had been a lot of speculation over the past 24 hours.

"What I can tell you is we're following the seven-point plan as we have been now for some months and into next week there will be an open and transparent discussion about the next steps that are going to follow in the CF-18 replacement," MacKay said.

MacKay didn't answer when asked whether the cost would be $40 billion.

NDP defence critic Jack Harris said Prime Minister Stephen Harper should take responsibility for having appointed MacKay as minister and for the process to select new fighter jets.

'Process is in a shambles'

"The whole process is in a shambles, quite frankly," Harris told reporters outside the House.

"This is not good enough. We've got enough misleading information out there in front of the public.... They didn't do their due diligence, they didn't have an open, fair and transparent process.

"They've demonstrated their incompetence in a $40-billion-plus contract."

Harris also pointed to the long-running Conservative attacks on anyone who questioned their cost estimate of the F-35, including that of Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page, whose projected cost was confirmed by Ferguson's report.

A statement from Ambrose's office on Thursday said the government will provide "a comprehensive public update" before the House rises.

"We are committed to completing the seven point plan and moving forward with our comprehensive, transparent approach to replacing Canada's aging CF-18 aircraft," the statement said.

The government has long maintained the F-35 was the only plane that met Canada's needs. But last week, Gen. Tom Lawson, chief of the defence staff, told MPs there are other planes with stealth capabilities.

A spokesperson for Lockheed Martin referred questions to the Department of National Defence.

"Lockheed Martin has been a partner with the Canadian Forces for more than 50 years. We continue to look forward to supporting the Canadian government as they work to provide their air force fifth-generation capability for their future security needs," the spokesperson said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/12/06/poli-f35-pmo-government-fighter-jets.html

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por Juan David el Vie Dic 07, 2012 7:25 pm

Es posible recortes, pero que cancelen la compra siendo uno de los que se metió en la "colada" de desarrollarlo??? sería la embarradota!

Saludos.
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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por Sayeret Matkhal el Jue Dic 13, 2012 12:31 pm

Fuerzas Canadienses repelen emboscada en Afganistan

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por dragoncanada el Mar Ene 29, 2013 2:39 pm

Juan David escribió:Es posible recortes, pero que cancelen la compra siendo uno de los que se metió en la "colada" de desarrollarlo??? sería la embarradota!

Saludos.


No solo eso.

Existen firmas canadienses que están ofertando piezas y partes como el tren de aterrizaje, simuladores e incluso software. La cancelación de la compra le cerraría las puertas a estas empresas.
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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por dragoncanada el Jue Abr 04, 2013 12:27 am

F-18 de la Fuerza Aérea:

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por gamg73 el Jue Dic 12, 2013 12:02 am





Nos falta el cañoncito.

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por -Clark- el Mar Abr 01, 2014 6:46 am

La Fuerza Aérea de Canadá modernizará sus aviones Aurora a la espera de una nueva aeronave. El C295 de nuevo con posibilidades

MARTES 01 DE ABRIL DE 2014 10:36



(defensa.com) Canadá modernizará otros cuatro aviones CP-140 Aurora, el avión empleado por la Fuerza Aérea de dicho país para las misiones de patrulla marítima de largo alcance. Según el propio organismo, dicha modernización se ha decidido por no disponer de fondos para afrontar la compra de un nuevo avión, que era el principal objetivo.

De hecho los planes contemplaban adquirir entre 10 y 12 aviones en 2020 para lo que se disponía de un presupuesto de 2.700 millones de dólares. Sin embargo la Fuerza Aérea canadiense admitió que esta cifra es insuficiente para adquirir aviones de mayor porte de nueva fabricación como el P-8A y tampoco se prevé que se disponga de fondos adicionales.

La idea inicial era adquirir un nuevo avión de patrulla marítima de mayor tamaño y capacidad, en la línea del P-8A Poseidón estadounidense. Boeing incluso realizó una presentación del avión en 2012 en el que valoró el coste de la propuesta para Canadá en 3.000 millones de dólares, cifra que los expertos canadienses ampliaron hasta los 5.000 si se incluían repuestos, formación o simuladores.

Sin embargo se ha decidido modernizar estos cuatro aviones invirtiendo 548 millones de dólares después de que se hayan modernizado otros diez anteriormente, lo que requirió una inversión de 1.600 millones de dólares. El Aurora es un avión tetramotor similar al P-3 Orion que fue adquirido a comienzos de los ochenta y que con esta modernización pretende estar en servicio hasta 2030.



Estos cuatro aviones recibirán nuevas alas, radares y nuevos sensores, como los otros aparatos modernizados, incluyendo sistemas de aviónica y sensores nuevos, comunicaciones Link 16, comunicaciones por satélite y mejores sistemas de autoprotección. Se ha optado por esta modernización y por estudiar nuevas opciones basadas en aviones más pequeños y más accesibles. Este nuevo avión sería una plataforma de menor tamaño que se optimizaría con la instalación de equipos como un radar de barrido electrónico, sensores electro-ópticos, sistemas de guerra electrónica, inteligencia de señales o sistemas de identificación automática.

Boeing ha ofrecido un avión más barato que el P-8A, basado en la instalación de parte de sus sistemas en un avión Bombardier Challenger 605 que actualmente se encuentra en pruebas y que serviría para países que no pueden permitirse la compra del Poseidón.

Airbus Military ha ofrecido el C295 en versión de patrulla marítima recordando que Chile ha seleccionado este avión en configuración de guerra anti-submarina. (J.N.G.)

Fuente: http://www.defensa.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11941:la-fuerza-aerea-de-canada-modernizara-sus-aviones-aurora-a-la-espera-de-una-nueva-aeronave-el-c295-de-nuevo-con-posibilidades&catid=57:otan&Itemid=186
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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por HawksNest el Miér Ago 13, 2014 5:52 pm

CANSOFCOM | Comando de Operaciones de Fuerzas Especiales canadiense



Saludos
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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por dragoncanada el Jue Oct 02, 2014 10:13 pm

Canadá prepara sus cazas para entrar en la lucha contra ISIS


Fisher: Canadian fighter-bombers days away from joining battle against Islamic State

By Matthew Fisher, Postmedia News October 2, 2014



Fisher: Canadian fighter-bombers days away from joining battle against Islamic State


By Matthew Fisher, Postmedia News October 2, 2014

0


Story
Photos ( 1 )




IRBIL, Iraq — By the end of this week Ottawa is expected to order the RCAF to deploy CF-18 Hornet fighter-bombers to the Middle East to join the U.S.-led coalition that is bombing Islamic State.

One likely Canadian target may be found in the strategically important town of Tikrit where Islamic State murdered hundreds of Iraqis three months ago. Eleven years ago, the U.S. marines from an elite reconnaissance battalion that I was embedded with seized Saddam Hussein’s hometown, which is not far down the road from the Kurdish capital, Irbil.

There was great euphoria that night as the marines camped in the dirt below one of Saddam’s grandest palaces on the banks of the Tigris River. The marines and most Iraqis believed this had been the final battle of the second Gulf War and that peace was nigh.

Well, we all now know how that turned out.

It has taken Canada an unusually long time to decide what it will contribute, while its many allies in this war have made their plans known. Several small European countries already have dispatched F-16 Fighting Falcons to an air base in Jordan that has been used for years by the Americans. The British, understandably, have sent Tornados to Akrotiri, a base they have held on to since they stopped ruling Cyprus half a century ago. But the island in the eastern Mediterranean is a fair bit farther from Iraq and Syria than Jordan, which shares a long border with the countries where Islamic State has been on a murderous rampage, and therefore harder to operate fighter jets from.

U.S. warplanes are flying out of several bases in the Middle East. Its stealthy fifth generation F-22 Raptors are launching from the United Arab Emirates. Other American fighter-bombers, airborne tankers and surveillance aircraft are flying out of Kuwait and Qatar. The U.S. navy and marines fly from a nuclear aircraft carrier and an assault ship in the Persian Gulf.

Canada’s jets and perhaps a CP-140 reconnaissance aircraft and a refuelling tanker could end up flying from one of many allied airfields in the Middle East or even from the Kurdish-run piece of northeastern Iraq. However, doing so from there might require measures to protect the aircraft on the ground.

The Harper government has, as usual, been far less free with information than its allies. But the delay in declaring what Canada’s warplanes will do here could be because of a pending Turkish decision to allow European and North American aircraft to fly from fields in the south of that country. If so, perhaps Canada’s air crews and maintainers may be invited to camp out there.

Australia has contributed 600 personnel compared with a Canadian total that could top out at less than 200. Australia already has a spy plane and an refuelling aircraft flying from the UAE. Its six F-18 Super Hornets, which are bigger, far newer and have longer legs than Canada’s Hornets, have not been cleared yet to join the air campaign from what used to be a joint Canadian-Australian base outside Dubai. But the Super Hornets have been flying simulated missions in the Middle East since Sunday.

Turkey has been reluctant to get involved in the wars in Syria and Iraq because of the Kurdish minorities there and its own restive Kurdish minority. But with Islamic State now fighting only a few minutes walk from at least one spot on the 1,000-kilometre border that Syria shares with Turkey, and an estimated 160,000 desperate Syrian Kurdish refugees joining a throng of Syrian Arab refugees in southern Turkey, a robust response from Ankara is anticipated.

Part of the Turkish equation may rest upon the expected declaration by Washington of a no-fly zone over northern Syria and Iraq. If so, Canadian warplanes likely would carry out combat air patrols as well as flying combat sorties.

Another question is whether Canadian planes will bomb targets in Syria and Iraq or only Iraq. Because of the greater danger of surface-to-air missiles over Syria, several European countries have declared they will attack only in Iraq.

Most U.S.-led air wars have resulted in few casualties because the enemies in Libya, Iraq and Afghanistan had poor air defences that easily could be neutralized. Presumably U.S. airstrikes already have eliminated most of the air defence weapons systems that Islamic State swiped from the Iraqi and Syrian armies. That should make it easier for Canadian Hornet pilots when they join the other coalition air forces gathered in the Middle East.

The Harper government must explain to Canadians that no war is risk free. It also should say, but won’t, that air power alone has no chance of rooting out Islamic State members who have disappeared into the population, and that western combat troops will be required at some point.

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Fisher+Canadian+fighter+bombers+days+away+from+joining+battle+against/10253267/story.html
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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por Edwin Freyner Moreno Fies el Vie Oct 03, 2014 5:29 pm

Perdón hago esta pregunta que ojala no caiga en off topic, pero el titulo Fuerzas Armadas de la "República" de Canada me parece que está mal escrito, ya que si mal no estoy Canada es un "Dominio" de la corona Britanica y la jefe de estado es la reina de Gran Bretaña

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por gamg73 el Mar Mar 31, 2015 7:23 pm



Canadian Special Forces SGT Andrew Dorion asked that this picture be released in the event of his death. Please: Share this and repost it. He died on March 6th while performing his duties in the fight against ISIS with the Kurds. RIP WARRIOR! -CMH

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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

Mensaje por zito007 el Sáb Nov 19, 2016 12:46 am

CH-147F Chinook, de la Royal Canadian Air Force, a escasos 20 metros y se sentia como un black hawk a 50 Km


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Re: Fuerzas Armadas de la República del Canadá

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